REVIEW: Batman #79 continues the long-awaited romantic BatCat reunion

By Alex Batts — This week’s Batman #79 is the second part of an interlude within the City of Bane story arc. The last issue saw Batman and Catwoman spending quality couples time on a beautiful island. The two battled their feelings for each other, trying to overcome personal faults to be together. As with last week, writer Tom King is joined here by artist Clay Mann and colorist Tomeu Morey, with Clayton Cowles on letters. This issue is a great conclusion to a break from the chaos of City of Bane.

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REVIEW: Aquaman #52 is an action-heavy issue that lets its artwork shine

By Ander Lilly — When last we saw the former King of Atlantis, he was adjusting to life back in Amnesty Bay after time away on the mysterious island, "Unspoken Water." After recovering his memories, Arthur Curry now has a lot to take care of, including finding his love, Mera. Meanwhile, his arch-nemesis, Black Manta, has plans of his own — plans that involve a new way to bring down his enemy with help from Lex Luthor. Last issue, we were introduced to Black Manta's latest threat to Arthur: the Mecha Manta, a large killing machine programmed to think and act like his late father.

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REVIEW: Justice League #32 is another chapter in a massive bombastic epic

By Alex Batts — This week sees the release of Justice League #32, the third part in the epic Justice/Doom War story that has been building since the start of Scott Snyder’s run on the title. I’m going to attempt a concise recap before jumping into the major events of this issue, since there has been so much buildup. There are seven energies that make up the DC Multiverse as we know it, but there are also seven hidden dark energies, evil opposites of positive counterparts. The Still Force counters the Speed Force, the Ultraviolet Spectrum counters the emotional spectrums wielded by the Green Lantern Corps, and so on.

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REVIEW: Black Hammer Justice League #3 features humor and heartbreak in equal measure

By Nick Couture — Working outside of the big two, Jeff Lemire created his own universe of superheroes. These heroes in Black Hammer are heavily inspired by heroes we know and love. With Black Hammer Justice League #3, Lemire continues to have his cake and eat it too as he brings some DC heroes out of the toy chest and into his universe. Frustrations rise, painful old memories are rehashed, and new characters are brought into the fold, as each team struggles to figure out why their worlds were turned upside-down. Though it will likely be an inconsequential story in the larger context of the Black Hammer yarn, it’s still a must read for Black Hammer fans.

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REVIEW: Detective Comics #1011 is a satisfying end to this Batman v. Deadshot story

By Alex Batts — This week’s Detective Comics #1011 is the conclusion of a three-issue arc featuring Deadshot. This issue boasts slightly more action than the previous two, as we finally get a full-force showdown between Batman and Deadshot. As with previous issues in this arc, Peter Tomasi is joined by Christian Duce on art and Luis Guerrero on colors, with Rob Leigh lettering.

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REVIEW: Batman #78, ‘every panel of every page is stunning’

By Alex Batts — Up until this point, the City of Bane story arc has been pedal to the metal, full force insanity. This week’s Batman #78, however, puts on cruise control, sending readers on a semi-vacation with Batman and Catwoman. It’s a welcome break in pace, which keeps things interesting. Tom King is joined by frequent collaborators Clay Mann and Tomeu Morey on art duties, with Clayton Cowles on letters. This interlude — I’m not sure it’s officially called an interlude but I’m rolling with that — does something similar to the Kite-Man interludes in The War of Jokes and Riddles arc, in that both serve as a break from fast-paced high octane action while also lending it all an incredible amount of emotional weight.

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REVIEW: Pandemica #1 is a great debut issue for an intriguing conspiracy story

By Jarred A. Luján — Pandemica #1 is a new mini-series from IDW Publishing written by New York Times’ bestselling author Jonathan Maberry with line art by Star Wars: The Old Republic alumni Alex Sanchez. It’s also a timely book about designer pathogens used to commit ethnic cleansing across the globe. Which is, to be blunt about this, a pretty horrifying plot. The phrase “designer pathogens” alone gives me a sense of dread, and Maberry has made it quite clear that he wants the book to be grounded in reality, going so far as to mention that he has been conducting research with epidemiologists and molecular biologists to make the book more realistic.

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REVIEW: No One Left to Fight #3 makes us sad this comic has to eventually end

By Jarred A. Luján — No One Left to Fight #3 is out today, continuing a streak of excellence for one of the most fun comics being published today. This book really does fire on all cylinders, and while its rooted in nostalgic anime vibes, it also does so much to establish itself as its own unique and wonderful thing.

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